Lincoln-Douglas 1858 Charleston, SC Debate Anniversary
Much is made of idyllic moments in American history that are often misconstrued with reality. "Reality" being not the staging of events for more (significantly least) entertaining television programming but as in circumstances that actually transpired to a significantly eventful conclusion. The absence of lucidity that seems damning of our education are the convictions of Abraham Lincoln and seeing as we are within the season of presidential debate, why not on this anniversary of his 1858 Charleston, South Carolina debate with Senator Stephen Douglas, take a brief moment for realiclarity.

"I am not, nor ever have been, in favor of bringing about in any way the social and political equality of the white and black races, that I am not nor ever have been in favor of making voters or jurors of negroes, nor of qualifying them to hold office, nor to intermarry with white people; and I will say in addition to this that there is a physical difference between the white and black races which I believe will forever forbid the two races living together on terms of social and political equality. And in as much as they cannot so live, while they do remain together there must be the position of superior and inferior, and I as much as any other man am in favor of having the superior position assigned to the white race. I say upon this occasion I do not perceive that because the white man is to have the superior position the negro should be denied everything. I do not understand that because I do not want a negro woman for a slave I must necessarily want her for a wife. My understanding is that I can just let her alone." - Abraham Lincoln (18 September 1858)

As an added caveat, 1962 Nobel prize winning biologist James Dewey Watson who co-discovered the Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) strand with Francis Crick in 1953 was ostracized in 2007 for inferred comments he had made that seemed scientifically suited to Lincoln's understanding 149 years prior.

In the interview with The Sunday Times, Watson said he was "inherently gloomy about the prospect of Africa" because "all our social policies are based on the fact that their intelligence is the same as ours whereas all the testing says not really." He went on to say he hoped everyone was equal but that "people who have to deal with black employees find this is not true." - BBC News (18 October 2007)

What I would like to leave you with is an opportunity to self discovery by scientific deduction. The understanding of human evolution is that adaptation is a catalyst for intellectual growth. Suppose an individual were to stand in place while another were to visit every corner of the world. Which would you be inclined to say is more well versed? With that said, watch this extraordinary animation of the Journey of Mankind by The Bradshaw Foundation. Pay particular attention to the notation upon 85,000 years ago at the Gates of Grief.

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